February 23, 2011

Specialty Medical Chemicals

Posted in BADM 720 tagged , , , , at 8:41 pm by Sarah

Last week we read about a company that was built from the ground up in a unique way.  This week’s reading is about an executive who was put in charge of an existing company and all its existing management issues.  I hate to keep comparing my own workplace to our many examples of what not to do, but I find once again that I see many of the same issues above me at work.  I look at our middle management and see managers who are in direct competition for attention and resources, not coming together as a cohesive leadership team.  Most of my peers have very little idea of what other teams in the company do, and it is easy to lose sight of the big picture.  Our review system is vague and not constructive.

I think it’s kind of a shame that the managers in the reading seemed to be biased against the new CEO before he even arrived.  I understand that it can be difficult to be open-minded when the departing leader has been doing things a certain way for a long time and you have no idea what a new leader will be like.  But I would think that high level managers in a big company would have learned at some point in their careers how to quickly get on good terms with the person they report to, at least on a professional level, if not a personal level.  To show disapproval like these managers did set them up for failure right from the start.

Bringing in an outside opinion to help with personnel problems is an interesting idea.  On one hand, a manager in a CEO position should ideally already know his own strengths and weaknesses and be able to determine the same in his direct reports.  On the other hand, the professional outsider was able to pin down traits in the CEO that he was not aware of himself, as well as traits in the rest of the leadership team that had not shown through to him because of his position.  No matter how this information is gathered, it is crucial to understand employees’ personalities if you are going to understand how they work together and how you can move them around to influence that working relationship.

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